Section

  • As early as Christmas 1914, the old Old Dominicans reported that 66 former pupils had enrolled.  A ‘Friars Corps’ was formed at the school which received military drills and training (including 9-mile marches!), and got to use dummy rifles.  It was reported that before conscription was introduced, the numbers had risen to 140 – rising to about 200 by summer August 1916.  At least 13 were on the school’s ‘Roll of Honour’ by this time.

    Enthusiasm wasn’t restricted to the pupils either.  By August 1916, the Headteacher reported that his original staff of seven and several other temporary workers had ‘left to serve the country’s needs’ either in the field or in munition works.

    During the war, after prayer in the morning the Headteacher often gave pupils news of Old Boys who had been decorated, taken prisoner, wounded or killed.  For a while, the school had a refugee.  An eighteen-year-old Serb named Blagoyovitch.  He had escaped from his country owing to a physical peculiarity – he was double-jointed at the elbows.  When the Austrians rounded him up, he kept his arms bent backwards and was released as someone who was useless.  A frequent reminder of war was the airships that patrolled the Menai Straits and the coast.  Another way in which the war made itself felt was in the school meals.  Many items of food were in short supply and the ‘war bread’ grew less and less digestible.  To augment the uncertain flow of vegetables, part of the playing field was ploughed up and, under guidance, the pupils dug frantically and raised crops of potatoes and swedes.

    One Christmas the pupils were singing carols at a local hospital to the wounded men.  They received sweets and mince-pies after the performance, and then had a long walk home in the dark.

    However, the war eventually ended in 1918 and on 19th July 1919 the school participated in Bangor’s peace celebrations as it took it’s place in a procession through the City.

     

    On 1st August 1919, the Chronicle reported the unveiling of Ysgol Friars’ Roll of Honour on 25th July: ‘Then followed the unveiling and consecration of an oak tablet in memory of the 42 Friars boys who made the supreme sacrifice, and in the afternoon the ‘Old Boys’ made presentations to the Headmaster and to Mrs Glynne Williams.

    The memorial tablet, executed in dark oak with old gold lettering by Messrs W Brown & Son of Chester, according to the design of Messrs Douglas, Minshull and Muspratt, the architects of the school, contains the names of 44 ‘Old Boys’.

    The name of Lieutenant Arthur G Lewis, eldest son of Sir Henry and Lady Lewis, was inadvertently omitted from the list, but will be placed thereon without delay.  It was a difficult task to compile a list of Friars boys who have fallen in the war, and every effort has been made to make the list complete, but should there be still any name omitted it should be at once reported to the headmaster for insertion.  At the unveiling ceremony, the Headmaster stated that the memorial tablet had been put by Friars boys in honour of those other Friars boys, a gallant band of 42 who have fallen fighting for King and country for right against might in the Great War which had ended in a decisive victory for the Right.  The cost of it was defrayed out of the proceeds of the action of certain plays of Shakespeare in the Penrhyn Hall by Friars boys some time before the war.  A little fund of which the present boys are trustees, and they decided it could not be devoted to any higher purpose than the honouring within the school walls of those comrades of theirs who (to adopt the words of Pericles) ‘have given the crowning proof of their manly worth, who bore the brunt of the conflict with their bodies, and were removed from a scene, not of terror, but of glory.’  They were all his own dear pupils, and he called upon one of the most senior of his pupils, Mr JJ Marks (Llandudno) to unveil the Roll of Honour.  Mr Marks then unveiled the tablet, which was consecrated by Archdeacon Lloyd Jones MA, officiating on behalf of the Dean. 

    There were further addresses by Rev T Shankland MA and Dr R W Phillips, chairman of the governors of the school.

    During the ceremony two hymns, “How bright these glorious spirits shine” and “Trwy droiau’r byd, a’i wen, a’i wig” were sung.  The latter is a translation by Goronwy Owen, the famous writer who was a pupil of Friars from 1737 to 1747.

    • Pte

      R THOMPSON

      1st   Royal Dragoons

      1914

       

      Lieut

      MEURIG   OWEN

      RWF

      1917

      Lieut

      T L   PRITCHARD

      RWF

       

      2nd   Lieut

      H VIPOND

      Manchester   Regt

      Lieut

      OSWALD   GRIFFITH

      RFA

      1915

       

      Pte

      T G   WILLIAMS

      RWF

      Pte

      J D LEES

      Yorks   Regiment

       

      Lieut

      T H ELLIS

      RWF

      Pte

      JOHN GREEN

      2nd   Rifle Brigade

       

      Lieut

       G A JONES

      RGA

      Pte

      J W PARRY

      County of   Lond Regt

       

      Pte

      D REES   WILLIAMS

      RAMC

      Lieut

      VERNON E   OWEN

      RWF

       

      Lieut

      LLEWELYN T SHANKLAND

      RWF

      Pte

      J F SAVAGE

      RWF

       

      Pte

      RONALD HUW   ROWLAND

      RWF

      1918

      Pte

      R T JONES

      RWF

       

      2nd   Lieut

      G O   RICHARDS

      RWF

      Lieut

      E D G   WILLIAMS-MEYRICK

      RWF

      1916

       

      Lieut

      T B WINTER

      RWF

      Schl   Master

      T THOMAS

      H M S   Defence

       

      Lieut

      KENNETH G   EDWARDS

      RWF

      Lieut   & Adj

      C GLYN   ROBERTS

      RWF

       

      Major

      IAN BAXTER  

      RWF MC

      2nd   Lieut

      F   HARGREAVES

      King’s   L’pool Regt

       

      Lieut

      E H NOEL   SAVAGE

      RF

      2nd   lieut

      J G HUGHES

      RWF

       

      Pte

      W CARTNER   WILLIAMS

      7th Buffs   Regt

      Pte

      H G   RICHARDS

      RWF

       

      Pte

      A E LEWIS

      MGC

      Pte

      H R THOMAS

      S W   Borderers

       

      Pte

      L D JONES

      RAF

      2nd   Lieut

      T O THOMAS

      RWF

       

      Capt

      C COOIL

      RGA

      Pte

      G B HARRIS

      Cheshire   Regt

       

      Pte

      O A JONES

      5th   Glosters

      L Cpl

      A E BAGG

      Royal   Fusiliers

       

      Pte

      CECIL REAY   PUGHE

      Bedford   Regt

      Lieut

      J   FITZGERALD PRESTIDGE

      E Suffolk   Regt

      1917

       

      Flt Cadet

      JACK HUGHES

      RAF

      Capt

      A S   EDWARDS

      RWF

       

      Capt

      A T ORR

      RE

      1919

      Lieut

      A G LEWIS

      50th   Lancers

      1916

       

      Pte

      J D COOIL

      SWB

      1917

      Vivitis aeterno qui sie   cecidistis, honore

       

      IW

      EITHIR Y MAE ENEIDIAU Y RHAI CYFIAWN YN   LLAW DUW,

      AC NI CHYFFWRDD CYSTUDD A HWYNT

       

      WStBG

       

      1937

      QUAM POTUERE VIRI TIBI TRADERE, TRADE   SALUTEM

      TU,PUER: ARDENTEM LAMPADA CURSOR HABES

       

      WGW

      • Could be Private George Harris, son of Charles and Elizabeth Harris, of St Martin’s, Oswestry, Salop.  A member of the Cheshire Regiment, he died aged 26 on 25th October 1916 and is buried at Contay British Cemetery, Contay.


        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

        • Lance Corporal Arthur Edward Bagg, the son of George Bagg of 13 Oberstein Road, St John’s Hill, Battersea, London joined the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers).  He died on 9th September 1916 aged 29 and is buried at Guillemont Road Cemetery, Guillemont.

          Commonwealth War Graves Commission

          • Ian Baxter was the only son of Mr. James Baxter, The Gardens, Benarth, Conwy.  He was a former pupil of Ysgol Friars and a graduated at Bangor University.  Before the war be was carrying out Research in Forestry under a Government scheme.

             

            Captain Baxter enlisted in 1914 in the Royal Welch Fusiliers (9th Battalion) and shortly afterwards was given Commissioned rank.  He was awarded the Military Cross in 1917 for great coolness and courage in reorganising the front line while under heavy fire, and was also mentioned in Despatches.  Captain Baxter was killed on 30th May 1918, aged 24, and is buried in Chambreny British Cemetery, Marne.  He is commemorated on the cenotaph in Llanfairfechan and Conwy.

             

            Chronicle

            Llangollen Advertiser – Military Award

            History Points

            Commonwealth War Graves Commission

            • Caesar Cooil was the brother of Private John Cooil, also included on the memorial.  Their parents were Mr & Mrs C Cooil who lived at 2 Orme View, Euston Road, Bangor.  Caesar Cooil was educated at St Paul’s, Ysgol Friars and the University College, Bangor, and graduated BA in 1915.  A member of the University Officers’ Training Corp and a sergeant in the Railway Institute ‘Boys’ Brigade, he joined the Royal Garrison Artillery but died whilst at home on 11th November 1918, aged 27.  He is buried in Glanadda cemetery.

               

              Commonwealth War Graves Commission

               

              Cofeb y Dewrion

              • John Cooil was the brother of Captain Caesar Cooil, also included on the memorial. Their parents were Mr & Mrs C Cooil who lived at 2 Orme View, Euston Road, Bangor.  During the Great War h was a member of the South Wales Borderers (1st battalion).  He was killed, aged 20, on 10th November 1917 and is buried at Tyne Cot cemetery, Ypres.

                 

                Cofeb y Dewrion

                 

                Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                 

                Pupils visiting John Cooil’s gravestone on a school trip in 2008:

                • Algernon Edwards was the second son of John Stevenson Edwards and Kathleen Dora Edwards of Achnashean (also brother to Kenneth Edwards who is also included on the memorial).  He studied at Ysgol Friars and worked for the London & North Western Railway.  At the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Welch Fusiliers (17th Battalion) and in 1915 he was sent to France.  Lieutenant Edwards was injured at Mametz Wood on 10th July 1916.  Whilst leading his platoon into in the charge he was struck by shrapnel, which inflicted a bad scalp wound and concussion.  He was wearing a steel helmet at the time otherwise his injuries might have proved fatal.  He was subsequently invalided home, where he remained until March 1917.  As soon as he completely recovered, Algernon returned to France but was killed, aged 20, on Pilkem Ridge on 17th August 1917.  A fortnight before he was killed he wrote home saying he never felt ‘fitter’ in his life and was eagerly looking forward to the scrap which he thought was impending.  A brother officer, writing to the parents, stated that ‘he died a brave death fighting the enemy until the last moment.  Death was instantaneous, so that he could have felt no pain.’  Edwards was said to be ‘one of the most popular officers in the battalion’, and ‘would never ask his his men to do something he would never do himself’.  He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

                   

                  Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                   

                  Cofeb y Dewrion

                   

                  Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                   

                  • Kenneth Edwards was the eldest son of John Stevenson Edwards and Kathleen Dora Edwards of Bangor, Caernarvonshire (also brother to Algernon Edwards who is also included on the memorial).  A husband to Lucy E Edwards of Shrewsbury and father of two children, he joined the staff of the National Provincial Bank of Shrewsbury.  In November 1914 he resigned his position to join the 16th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers.  Lieutenant Edwards went to France in April 1916, fighting at Mametz Wood (July 1916) and Pilkem (August 1917).  In October 1917 he returned to England for light duty, and returned to France on 18th April 1918.  Later intelligence states that he was killed instantaneous in a communication trench by a shell at about midnight on 17th May 1918, aged 24.  He was buried by his friend, W F Costhelwaite, in Harponville communal cemetery, Somme.  19 of the 34 bodies buried here are Welsh.  When news of his death was reported in the Chronicle, Ysgol Friars flag was at half-mast out of respect to his memory.

                     

                    Cofeb y Dewrion

                    Chronicle - Roll of Honour

                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                     

                    • Robert Ellis was the son of Humphreys Ellis of ‘Llys Menai’, Menai Avenue, Bangor.  He joined the Royal Welch Fusiliers’ ‘Bantams’ as a private, and had been at the front as a commissioned officer for two years.  After his time at Ysgol Friars, he moved to Ruthin Grammar School before being employed at the Amlwch branch of Lloyds Bank.  He died on 21st October 1917, aged 21, and was buried at Messines Ridge British Cemetery.

                      Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                      Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                      • John Prestidge was the only son of Mr & Mrs Frank Prestidge, Victoria Park, Bangor (later 10 August Street, Llandudno), and grandson of the late Mr W O’Brien Fitzgerald, Bangor. He was educated at Ysgol Friars and later he was articled to Mr Meacher, auctioneer and estate agent, of Penmaenmawr and Conway, and passed the Surveyor’s examination.  On 15th September 1914 he joined the Public Schools Boys Battalion and went to Epsom, where he was nominated for Sandhurst the same year.  In Spring 1915 he joined the First Suffolk Regiment and immediately proceeded to Salonika and the Bulgarian frontier, where he was wounded.  Upon his recovery he went out to France and was in the first battle of Loos (where he was promoted to First Lieutenant for his valour on the field), the Somme, Ovillers, Posieres, Fleurs.  He was acting Captain in 1916-17 but was again wounded, this time in the hand and arm, and was also badly gassed.    After recovering he was detailed light duty in an English training centre but again returned to France.  Wounded and reported missing at Arras on 28 April 1917, he was brought to a clearing station two days later, very weak, but succumbed to his injuries on 2nd May 1917, aged 23, and was buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas de Calais.  In a letter of sympathy, the Chaplain wrote that when Prestidge was brought to the clearing station “he told the nurse that he was so glad that his mother would know that he was taken care of”.

                         

                        Cofeb y Dewrion

                        Chronicle Casualty List

                        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                        • Rifle Brigade (4th Battalion), 4th May 1915

                           

                          Could it be this one?

                          • Oswald Griffith was the son of Mr & Mrs Robert Griffith, 5 Lonbopty, Bangor.  Educated at Ysgol Friars and University College, Bangor, he later went to teach at Hardwick School, Ysgol Syr Hugh Owen and Westborough Road Council School (Southend) before signing up to the Royal Field Artillery (80th Battery) in 1914.  He left England for France on 22nd February 1915 for two weeks training of observations in the firing line. 

                             

                            Oswald had asked a Major if he could stay with the infantry for 24 hours in the trenches.  He went down to them on the 25th February and was sketching the German front line during the morning with a periscope he had borrowed.  At 10.30am he was in the dugout with the officers when he said ‘I think I will go and get something to eat’.  He got up and possibly forgot to keep his head down.  He must have been visible over the parapet for about a second before the German sniper shot him at once in the back of the head, low down near his neck.  He remained unconscious until about 5.30pm when he died (27th February 1915). 

                            Lieutenant Griffiths was buried at Nieuwkerke Churchyard, Belgium and is also commemorated with a bronze plaque (pictured below) in Westborough Junior School, Westcliff.  The Major of Oswald’s brigade had considered him his right-hand man and had held him in the highest regards. 

                             

                            His parents were notified of his death at the same time as when they received a telegram written by Oswald just a few days previously.  He wrote that he was very comfortable, although British shells were flying over his head, and he was very glad to have the experience.

                             

                            An ‘impressive service’ was held in his memory was held at Bangor Cathedral in March 1915.

                            Cofeb y Dewrion

                            Chronicle – Memorial at Bangor Cathedral

                            Chronicle – Report of death

                            Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                            • Frank Hargraves was the only son of Steven & Susie Hargraves of Springfield, Marple, Cheshire.  In his youth he was often with in Bangor with his aunt and uncle, Mr & Mrs R H Pritchard, The Cottage, and was for a short time at Ysgol Friars.  On the outbreak of the war he joined the King’s Liverpool Regiment.  He enlisted into the army on 5 August - the day after War was declared. His service papers still exist at the National Archives and they show him to have been 5' 7" tall - average height for those days. The medical examination passed him fit for duty, noting he had good vision and a good physical development. He had joined the 1/6th Battalion of the King's (Liverpool) Regiment - one of its Territorial Battalions - and was given 1704 as his service number.

                              As with many middle class young men, he quickly sought to become an officer, making his application on 19 December. However, unlike many of his contemporaries, it wasn't immediately acted on and he went overseas as a Lance Corporal on 24 February 1915.

                              However, after a few weeks in the trenches, his application was approved and he returned to the UK on 6 May. After completing his officer training on 5 June, nd Lieutenant Hargraves was posted to the newly formed 19th Battalion of the Welsh Fusiliers. This had been established as a "Bantam Battalion" formed of men who did not meet the army's original regulation minimum height of 5' 3". All of Frank's men would, therefore, be between 5' and 5 3" and, although not tall himself, he would have seemed an imposing figure by comparison. The Battalion went overseas on 1 June 1916 and Frank was with them as its Machine Gun Officer in charge of the teams of men who operated the Battalion's light Lewis guns.

                              Frank will have seen much fighting during the Battle of the Somme in the summer and autumn of 1916 and was "Mentioned in Despatches", in the despatch of Sir Douglas Haig, dated 13 November and published in the London Gazette on 2 January 1917. Of course, by then, Frank was already dead.

                              To the south, the Battle of the Somme had been underway for nearly two weeks, but near the village of Calonne, things were relatively quiet. There was, however, no shelter for the almost constant shelling by the enemy and 13 July 1916 was no exception. The Battalion was in the trenches when it came under fire from German trench mortars and heavy artillery. Frank was killed outright. One of his men was badly wounded and died a short while later.

                              Six months later he went out to the Front and went through the fierce battles of Ypres, Hill 60 and St Eloi, proving himself to be a brave soldier.  He was twice offered commissions, accepting in the Royal Welch Fusiliers the following June and later promoted full Lieutenant.  He was also appointed machine gun officer for his battalion.   He was killed on 12th July 1916, aged 27, and is buried at Loos British Cemetery.

                               

                              Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                              Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                              Local history research

                              • J Gwilym Hughes was the second son of the Mr & Mrs J T Hughes of Hazelwood, Bangor.  He was educated at St Paul’s School, at ysgol Friars and the North Wales University College, Bangor, where he graduated with honours.  While at the University College, where he was one of the most popular students, he was a member of the Officer’s Training Corps.  On leaving the College, he entered the teaching profession, and was appointed senior master at Llanidloes County School, afterwards taking up a post of Assistant Master at Ysgol Friars, where he was engaged when the war broke out.  Joining the Army, he received a commission in the Royal Welch Fusiliers in the Autumn of 1915, and was promoted Lieutenant in the summer of 1916.  He proceeded to the Front on 6th September 1916, was wounded on 23rd October and died, ‘as the result of an accident’ on 3rd November 1916, aged 35.  He is buried at Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension in the Somme, France.

                                 

                                Lieutenant Hughes took a prominent part in organising Cymrodorion Societies, both at Llanidloes and at Bangor, being Secretary of the latter Society.  He was an active worker in connection with the last National Eisteddfod at Bangor.


                                Cofeb y Dewrion

                                Chronicle - Report

                                Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                 

                                • Flight Cadet Jack Hughes was the son of Hugh and Ellen Hughes, Tan y Bryn, Amlwch.  He previously worked at Lloyds Bank, Bangor and Ellesmere branches. Jack enlisted on 4th June 1918 and served with No.1 Squadron. He died of injuries received in a flying accident at Turnberry, Scotland, on 25th November 1918 aged 18 and is buried at Amlwch Cemetery.  Jack is also commemorated at Llangefni County School, Amlwch War Memorial and the North Wales Heroes' Memorial Arch, Bangor.

                                  Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                  • Gwilym Jones  was the son of Lewis Davies Jones and Elizabeth Thomas Jones of 3 Edge Hill, Bangor.  Educated at Ysgol y Garth, Ysgol Friars and Ysgol Ganolraddol Aberdare, ei graduated with BSc at the University College of Bangor in 1909.  He taught Science at Chelmsford Grammar School, Stourbridge & Saffron Walden.  Lieutenant Edwards volunteered for the British Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders before being later assigned to the Royal Garrison Artillery (41st Siege Battery) and fought at Vimy Ridge and Messines Ridge. 

                                     

                                    Gwilym was in charge of a party of men getting guns into a difficult forward position, close to Ypres.  Soon after he had succeeded in hauling the last gun out of a shell hole in which it had been stuck for some time, he was killed instantaneously on 25th October 1917, aged 31.

                                     

                                    His Commanding Officer wrote to his family: ‘The men showed their appreciation of his value by carrying his body back four miles, mostly through shelled areas, in order that he might rest in peace in a British cemetery behind the lines.  He died gallantly carrying out most critical work, and we were proud of him.’  He was buried at Bleuet Farm Cemetery.

                                     

                                    Cofeb y Dewrion

                                    Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                     

                                    • Owen Jones was the son of Captain & Mrs M E Jones of Assheton House, Y Felinheli.  He was a member of the 5th Gloucesters (2nd & 5th Battalion) and was killed on 24th October 1918, aged 21.  He is buried Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France.

                                       

                                      Chronicle – Roll of Honour


                                      Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                      • Harry Jones of Bro Heulog, St David’s Road, Caernarfon, was the son of Rowland and Jessie Lloyd Jones of 20 Hampton Road, Caernarfon.  He was a member of the Royal Air Force and died on 25th October 1918, aged 19.  He is buried at Llanbeblig Churchyard, Caernarfon.

                                         

                                        History Points

                                         

                                        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                         

                                        • Robert Jones the son of Mr & Mrs Evan Jones (formerly of Port View, Garth Road, Bangor but during the war 24 Rower Road, Kensington, Liverpool).  He attended Ysgol y Garth and later ysgol Friars, where he was familiarly known as “RE” amongst his school friends.  A member of the Royal Welch Fusiliers, Private Jones was carrying water to his platoon when a shell burst near him and he was mortally wounded on 24 December 1915 and died three hours later, aged 20.  He is buried at La Gorgue Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.


                                          Cofeb y Dewrion

                                           

                                          Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                          • J Lees of the Yorkshire Regiment died in 1915.

                                            • Arthur Lewis was the son of the Very Reverend Evan Lewis, Dean of Bangor, and Adelaide Lewis.  He was a member of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps (2nd Battalion).  He died of a “gun shot wound and fractured right thigh” on 30th October 1918, aged 46.  Private Lewis was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas De Calais.

                                               

                                              Attestation paper

                                               

                                              Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                              • Arthur Lewis was the eldest son of Sir Henry and Lady Lewis of Pendyffryn, Upper Bangor.  Sir Henry, knighted in 1911, was a prominent Calvinistic Methodist in North Wales and played an important role in securing the site in Bangor for the University College of North Wales.  He was educated at Ysgol Friars and Bala Grammar School, and underwent a course of training on the HMS Conway on merseyside.  His career in the Merchant Service, in which he obtained his Master’s Certificate, was full of incidents.  He was wrecked three times, took part in the great fire at Baltimore, the Spanish Phillipine War (1898-1902), and the South African War (1899-1902).  In 1904 he happened to be in Baltimore, USA, when fire destroyed much of the city. The flames took more than 24 hours to extinguish. Arthur took part in the desperate attempts to fight the fire. 

                                                 

                                                On the outbreak of the Great War, he joined the Seinde Cavalry Regiment, went to India in November 1914.  He returned to Europe the following year to fight in France with the 30th Lancers, Indian Expeditionary Force in August 1915.  In 1916 he travelled again to India was then posted to Baghdad in March 1917 as a Lieutenant with the Indian Army Reserve of Officers, attached to the 13th Duke of Connaught’s Own Lancers (Watson’s Horse).  He was wounded there in May 1917, dying after a short illness of paralysis at Baghdad on 10th July 1917, aged 38.  Lieutenant Lewis is buried in Baghdad (North Gate) Cemetery, Iraq.

                                                 

                                                Chronicle – Casualty List

                                                Cofeb y Dewrion

                                                History Points

                                                Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                • Edmund Williams-Meyrick was born in 1878, the son of Reverend John and Clara Meyrick, of Beaumaris, Anglesey.  They later moved to 2 Menai View Terrace, Bangor.  Edmund was taught at Ysgol Friars before moving to St. David's College, Lampeter in January 1899, and became a member of the Inner Temple. After becoming ordained as a Clerk in Holy Orders, he married Gwendoline Kate Dew, of Rhyl, in 1902, and the couple resided prior to the war at Withy Cott, Abbotsbrook, Bourne. Edmund was commissioned into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was posted to Gibraltar, with the 1st Garrison Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Whilst on active duty, he succumbed to sun-stroke and died suddenly in Gibraltar on 7 May 1916, aged 39.  Edmund’s grave at Gibraltar (North Front) Cemetery is pictured below.  Servicemen buried here died either on passing ships or at the nearby Military Hospital.

                                                  Edmund’s wife later erected a memorial to him at Wooburn St Paul’s Church, Buckinghamshire:

                                                  Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                  Y Clorianydd – Adroddiad farwolaeth

                                                  • Alexander Orr was born at Tilbury, Essex, the son of Alexander Thomson Orr and Kathleen Jenny M Orr of Longford House, Holyhead. Captain Orr was educated at Larchfield Academy, Helensburgh (Scotland) and later Ysgol Friars. He entered Manchester University in 1908, aged 16, and studied Mechanical Engineering. He was previously a Probationer (Apprentice?) for the London and North-Western Railway at Ruthin. He served in the Manchester University Officer Training Corps from 1 November 1908 to 30 October 1912. At outbreak of war he volunteered for service and was gazetted as Lieutenant in September 1914 into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He entered France on 20 July 1915, with the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. On 9 January 1917 he was transferred to the General List for duty as an Anti-Gas Instructor. On 28 November 1917 he was promoted to Captain, Royal Engineers and was posted to Italy where he assumed the duty of Assistant Chemist, Adviser to Gas Services at the General Head Quarters (GHQ), Italy. In November 1917 five Divisions of the British Army with supporting troops, including Royal Engineers, were sent to Italy to bolster the Italian Army against the Austria-Hungarian forces. Captain Orr was part of this effort.  It is reported that at some point he was wounded and also mentioned in despatches (this was probably whilst serving in France). He died of Broncho-pneumonia at No. 24 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS), Italy on 3 January 1919, aged 26.  Captain Orr was buried at Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension, Italy.  He left a widow, Hilda Stuart Orr, and a daughter, Jean, aged one.

                                                     

                                                    Source material

                                                     

                                                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                    • Meurig Owen was the son of Thomas John (a builder) and Annie Ellen Owen of Llugwy Cottage, Llanfairfechan and later of Neuadd Wen, The Close, Llanfairfechan. Said to be ‘one of the most brilliant pupils who ever passed through’ the school, Meurig was a former head scholarship boy won the Meyrick Scholarship to Jesus College (Oxford) where he commenced his studies in October 1914. In January 1916 he was called up to serve in the army and joined the Welsh Regiment.  After serving in France he was sent to cadet school and had only been three weeks at the front when he was killed by a shell whilst taking a party up the line at the Battle of Ypres, 31 July 1917, aged 21.  Lieutenant Owen is commemorated at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

                                                       

                                                      Chronicle – Roll of Honour
                                                      History Points

                                                      Commonwealth War Graves Commission
                                                      Gwynedd Archives

                                                       

                                                      Pupils locate Meurig Owen’s name on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial during a school trip in 2006:

                                                      • Is this the same Private J W Parry of the County of London Regiment who died in 1914 that is listed on the Ysgol Friars memorial?

                                                         

                                                        John Parry was the son of William and Mary Parry of ‘Maes Llwyn’, Newton Street, Llanberis.  Having been educated at Ysgol Brynrefail he obtained a degree and was a French teacher at Richmond for years. A resident in Gunnersbury, north London, he enlisted at the County of London Regiment battalion headquarters in St John's Hill, Clapham Junction.  During the War he served as an interpreter and despatch rider. He was shot by a sniper and died of his wounds on 16th November 1915, Aged 35. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery.

                                                         

                                                        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                        • Vernon Owen was the only son of the Reverend Thomas Edward Owen, MA and Eleanor Owen of the Vicarage, Blaenau Ffestiniog.  He attended Ysgol Friars – he was a resident pupil there in 1911 - and went on to study theology at the University College of North Wales. Vernon was photographed as a member of the UCNW football team, 1913-14 (right). In 1914, this team had the satisfaction of winning a thrilling 'varsity series' against the local teacher training college, Bangor Normal College.  Lieutenant Owen was regarded as a ‘strenuous defender’ and was described as, Unassuming and ever ready to do a good turn.  He was very popular at Friars and at the University College. He was an enthusiastic footballer, having played for Friars, Bangor Athletic, the 'Varsity and the Bangor Town Club. On and off the football field he always "played the game". The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, 5 September 1919, said he was one of the finest football players of the Bangor College team, of which he was at one time captain. He too was a fine cricketer."

                                                           

                                                          Vernon was a member of the University College Officers' Training Corps and, on the outbreak of the Great War, he enlisted as a private at his University on 10 October 1914. His medical report states that he was 5ft 7 1/2ins tall, weighed 126 lbs. and had good vision and physical development. He had a fresh complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair. His mother signed his application form in which he asked to go into a North Wales battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He joined up as a temporary 2nd Lieut. the 9th (service) Battalion RWF which had been formed at Wrexham on 9 September 1914. In September 1914 it was attached to 58th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. Vernon was present at the Battle of Loos and escaped, unscathed, from that appalling encounter.

                                                           

                                                          On 7th November 1915 Vernon had been ordered to lead a platoon of soldiers to take over a portion of the front line near Cambrai.  However, his Commanding Officer had not been informed of how difficult the upper part of the trench had become, owing to damage from grenades, shelling and heavy rain (four inches in a week!), when he had told Vernon to take the most direct route possible.  Unusually, this was to take place during daylight (this may be down to the recent misty mornings).  Unfortunately, owing to orders being late, there was some delay in the advance and by the time they set off, the mist had lifted.

                                                           

                                                          Between 2 and 3pm, they found Lieutenant Owen’s force could advance no further, some of his men were bogged down in mud, unable to move.  The delay in relieving the front line was becoming even later and so Vernon rashly decided to climb over the wall to see if his platoon could proceed under cover outside the communication trench.  At this point a bullet struck his thigh, shattering the bone.

                                                           

                                                          A series of telegrams was sent to his parents.  Vernon was moved to in No. 1 Red Cross Hospital, Le Touquet with perforated bullet wound left thigh, where he was dangerously ill.  Should they so wish, his parents were permitted to visit him, without a passport even!  On 29 November 1917, a final telegram was sent, it read: ‘Deeply regret to inform you 2nd Lieut. V. E. Owen Welsh Fusiliers died from secondary haemorrhage following shell wound. Secretary of State expresses his sympathy.’  It was reported that Vernon’s father had arrived in time to be with him when he died.  Lieutenant Owen was aged 22 and buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, above the River Canche.

                                                           

                                                          The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard, 5 September 1919 said that his cricket bat lay under the Roll of Honour at Friars School.

                                                           

                                                          Vernon’s name appears on a memorial at Bangor University where he was studying for the ministry and on two memorials in Bangor Cathedral. In the church of St Hywyn, Aberdaron a vestry was dedicated to his memory: 'In ever affectionate memory of Lieut. Vernon E. Owen 9th (Ser.) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, dearly loved and only son of the Vicar of Aberdaron, who died of wounds received on active service at Festubert, France, November 29th, 1915, aged 22 years. This was erected by Aberdaron Church people and neighbouring friends as a testimony of their deep respect for the first volunteer from the parish during the Great European War”. For many years a photo of Vernon was displayed on the wall inside.


                                                          Family history webpage

                                                          Chronicle – List of Casualty

                                                          Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                          • Cecil Pughe was born in Bangor, the son of James William and Louisa Pughe of ‘Silverstone’, Capel Road, Oxhey, Watford, Hertfordshire.  When he signed up, Private Pughe lived in Oxhey, Watford, and enlisted there, joining the 4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment (he was previously a private in the Northamptonshire Regiment).  Before he enlisted in the army, Private Pugh was employed by the South Eastern & Chatham Railway Company as a Clerk.  He was died on 27 August 1918, aged 31, and is buried on in Australian Imperial Force Burial Ground, Flers, Somme.


                                                            Dover Marine Station – Roll of Honour

                                                            Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                             

                                                            • Capt. Thomas Prichard of the Royal Welch Fusiliers (2nd Battalion) was the son of Thomas Prichard, BA (vicar of Amlwch, Anglesey) and his wife, Jane.  He was educated at Ysgol Friars, later Trent College in Nottingham and finally Trinity College, Dublin.  Thomas joined the 4th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers in 1900 and served for some time as Instructor of Musketry.  He later transferred to the 1st Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers and served in the South African Campaign, taking part in operations in Transvaal and Orange River State from 1901-2.  He joined the Reserve of Officers in 1907 and was employed by the Board of Agriculture.  In August 1908 he married Dorothy, daughter of Leopold McKenna and niece or Reginald McKenna, Chancellor of the Exchequer.   On 5th August 1914 Thomas re-joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers and went at once to France.  Within a month he was promoted to Captain but was wounded on 27th October, later dying of his wounds in the hospital at Boulogne on 9 November 1914, aged 33, leaving a widow, Dorothy Prichard, and two children: Cicely Gwladys (aged 5) and Leopold Owen (aged 2).  He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.  Captain Pritchard is also commemorated on the Penmachno and Caernarfon cenotaph, as well as the war memorial at St John’s School, Leatherhead (Surrey).

                                                               

                                                              Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                              History Points

                                                              • Gwilym Richards was the son of Mr William Richards, Fish merchant, and Mrs A Richards, Bodifir, Bangor.  Educated at Ysgol Friars, he worked in London City and Midland Bank, Colwyn Bay, before the war.  He volunteered to service the army in 1915, joining the Royal Welch Fusiliers (14th Battalion).  During at attack on 22 April 1918, he was mortally wounded, dying in a hospital the following day, aged 21.  He is buried at Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme.

                                                                Y Clorianydd – adroddiad farwolaeth

                                                                Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                                                                Cofeb y Dewrion

                                                                History Points

                                                                Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                •   

                                                                  Cadwaladr Roberts was the son of the Reverend Peter Jones-Roberts and Mrs S E Jones-Roberts, of ‘Glynawel’, College Road, Bangor.  Educated at Kingswood School, Bath and Ysgol Friars, he gained a scholarship to the University College of Bangor.  One of his old teachers said of him: ‘He was a youth of more than ordinary intellectual ability, frank and lovable in disposition, and of sterling character.’  In January 1914 he joined the Royal Welch Fusiliers (9th Battalion) and was soon promoted to lieutenant and then made Adjutant after the Battle of Loos.  However, whilst fighting the Prussian Guards at La Boisselle, he was killed on 3 July 1916, aged 21.  He is buried at Ovillers Military Cemetery.

                                                                   

                                                                  Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                                                                  Cofeb y Dewrion

                                                                  History Points

                                                                  Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                  • Ronald Rowlands was the youngest son of Mr W Huw Rowland, Town Clerk of Bangor, and of Mrs Rowland, Holmswood, Oak Terrace, Beech Street, Liverpool.  He was educated at Ysgol Friars and won the higher certificate of the Central Welsh Board.  Ronald joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps and was attached to the 2nd/15th Battalion London Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own Civil Service Rifles).  He died of wounds received while fighting in Palestine, on some of the hills in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem, and was buried there on 20 February 1918 at the early age of 19 years.  He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial.  The following verses were written by him, and sent home three days before he was killed:

                                                                     

                                                                    List to my tale, of, beloved!

                                                                                    The woes that now I recite,

                                                                    Tis a tale of a lonely shepherd

                                                                                    Watching his sheep through the night.

                                                                     

                                                                    In a barren cave on the hillside,

                                                                                    Where the wind cuts keen as a sword,

                                                                    Chanting his prayers to Allah

                                                                                    That day might again be restored.

                                                                     

                                                                    Listen!  Tis I am the shepherd,

                                                                                    And my soul is a gloomy cave;

                                                                    For the night of despair is about it,

                                                                                    Heed thou the boon I crave.

                                                                     

                                                                    Thou art my light in the darkness

                                                                                    Be thou the dawn in my sky,

                                                                    That is the prayer of the shepherd

                                                                                    Heed it, my love, or I die.

                                                                     

                                                                    History Points

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                                                                    Chronicle article

                                                                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission


                                                                     

                                                                    • Noel Savage, as he was known, was the youngest son of Colonel Hugh Savage, VD, of Brynafon, Bangor, and Catherine Lucy Savage.  Noel was their second son who was killed in the war (his brother, John Frederick Savage, is also commemorated).  He was educated at Ysgol Friars and the University College, Bangor.  When war broke out, he came home from British north Borneo and joined the Royal Anglesey Engineers as a Second Lieutenant, with which Regiment he went to France in May 1916, being afterwards transferred as a Lieutenant to No 1 Foreways Company, Royal Engineers.  He was hit by a shell during a dangerous mission and was killed instantly at Herrisart on 29 June 1916, aged 29.  His Commanding Officer wrote: ‘There was no possible chance of taking any more cover than he had, as they were so close to the enemy that there was no warning noise of the salvo arriving.  The first intimation they had were the shells bursting, one of which killed [Noel] instantly.  This was proved by the entirely peaceful expression on his face  he had several wounds, one at least reaching a vital spot.’  He is buried at Herissart Communal Cemetery.

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                                                                      Photo of Sappers’ Diary

                                                                      Chroncile – Roll of Honour

                                                                      Chronicle Obituary notice

                                                                      Family letter about Noel’s death and grave

                                                                      Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                      • John Savage, or Freddy as he was known, was the second son of Colonel Hugh Savage, Brynafon, Bangor, and was married to Miss Peggy McInroy of Orme Road, Bangor.  Freddy was their first son who was killed in the war (his brother, Edward Noel Savage is also commemorated).  He was educated at Ysgol Friars and was a keen football player.  As a boy Freddy joined the Volunteer Force as bugler in the Welsh Carnarvon Artillery Volunteers and served for some years, retiring as a Corporal.  Before joining the army he was a Cashier at the office of Messrs. Allsopp & Sons, Bangor, and previous to this he was for two years engaged at Marshall Fields, in Chicago.  Fred volunteered to join the Royal Welch Fusiliers (16th Battalion) but died of septic pneumonia caused by an injury to the foot received while training at Winchester on 6 November 1915, aged 28.  He left a widow, Miss Peggy McInroy of Orme Road, Bangor, and two children (Fred, aged 9, and Eric, aged 1).  He is commemorated at Glanadda Cemetery, Bangor.

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                                                                        Flintshire Observer – Report of death

                                                                        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                        • Llywelyn Shankland was the son of the Reverend Thomas Shankland, MA, and Mrs Shankland, Brynawelon, Bangor.  Educated at Ysgol Friars and Clynnog Fawr, and later the the University College of Bangor, when war broke out he decided to enlist with the Officers Training Corps.  In October 1914 he volunteered to join the army, and was commission as Second Lieutenant in the North Wales Bantams, 19th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers.  He went to France and was engaged in many fierce battles, was injured several times but was mortally wounded on 24 November 1917, dying on 27 November, aged 26.  He is burried at Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, Somme.

                                                                           

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                                                                          History Points

                                                                          Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                          • Thomas Thomas was the son of Mr & Mrs John Thomas, 13 Crescent, Upper Bangor.  He was educated at the National School, Upper Bangor, Ysgol Friars and at the University College of Bangor, where he obtained the degree of BSc.  He was then appointed after competition, to a Mastership on the naval training ship ‘Impregnable’.  While there he was promoted Supervisor on four of H M Ships.  He joined the HMS ‘Defence’ two days before the Jutland Battle, which ship was lost with eight hundred lives on 31st May 1916. He was 26 years of age.  Thomas is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

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                                                                            HMS Defence - Wikipedia

                                                                            Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                            • Robert Thomson was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs William Thomson, Capel Ogwen, Penrhyn Park, Bangor.  He was educated at Ysgol Friars.  Robert George Thomson served in South Africa during the Boer War, for which he held the Queen’s medal with five clasps.  He was afterwards stationed in India with his regiment for four years.  After his army service he joined the Liverpool City Police Force.  At the outbreak of war he rejoined his regiment, 1st Royal Dragoons, and went to France with the Expeditionary Force, thereby gaining the Mons Star medal, 1914.  He died of wounds on 2 November 1914, aged 33.  He is buried at Llandegai Churchyard.

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                                                                              Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                              • Hugh Vipond, who for some time lived at Llanfairfechan, was the son of Mrs L E Tarr of 44 Barton Street, Manchester,  He was in the 1st/6th Battalion Manchester regiment.  The battlefields were were searched for equipment that could be salvaged and put to re-use.  This cost-cutting would have disastrous results on 28 July 1917 when two salvaged grenades exploded prematurely during a training session in front of other officers.  The Bombing Officer, Second Lieutenant Hugh Vipond, was killed, aged 21.  He was buried the next day with full military honours at Achiet-Le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas de Calais.

                                                                                Chronicle – Roll of Honour

                                                                                6th Battalion, the Manchester Regiment

                                                                                Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                                • David Williams was the only son of John Eyton Williams and Abigail Williams, late of the Post Office, Llanfairfechan.  A member of the Royal Army Medical Corps (21st Field Ambulance) during the war, he died on 3 October 1917, aged 21, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

                                                                                  Penmaenmawr & Dwygyfylchi History

                                                                                  Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                                   

                                                                                  Ysgol Friars pupils locate David Williams’ name on the Tyne Cot Memorial on a school trip in 2008:

                                                                                  • Thomas Williams was the eldest son of Mr Thomas Williams & Mrs Mary Williams, 33 Greenfield Terrace, West End, Bangor.  Educated at Ysgol Friars, he later went to the University College of Bangor, where he graduated with honours in French.  Before joining the army, he taught French at Ysgol Moreton House, Cardiff.    A member of the Royal Welch Fusiliers (16th Battalion), he died on   2 August 1917, aged 33, and is commemorated at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

                                                                                     

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                                                                                    History Points

                                                                                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                                    • William Williams was the son of Mr Owen Thomas Williams & Mrs Fanny Williams, 68 Orme Road, Bangor.  He was in the service of the Post Office Savings Bank at London when he joined the Army in November 1917.  On 7 April 1918 he went to France with the 7th Battalion of the East Kent Regiment but was killed in action on 18 September 1918, aged 19.  He is commemorated on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial, Pas de Calais.

                                                                                       

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                                                                                      Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                                      • Thomas Winter was the eldest son of Mr Thomas Winter, a Professor of Agriculture at the University College of North Wales, Bangor, and of Mrs Winter, Newby Terrace, Deiniol Road, Bangor.  He was educated at Ysgol Friars and at Giggleswick school.  In October 1913 he entered Bangor University College, having obtained a Caernarfonshire Exhibition of £20.  He joined the Royal Welch Fusiliers (13th Battalion) in 1917, went to France on 22 August 1917 and was killed near Albert on 22 April 1918, aged 19.  He is buried at Bouzincourt Ridge Cemetery, Albert, Somme.

                                                                                        Y Clorianydd – Adroddiad farwolaeth

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                                                                                        Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                                                                                        Pupils from Ysgol Friars visiting Thomas Winter’s grave on a school trip in 2008: